‘Crazy Rich Asians’ has cliché, repetitive storyline

The most popular movie right now might not be as good as people are saying.

“Crazy Rich Asians” is a romantic/screwball comedy. The movie, which features an all-Asian cast, is about Nick Young, played by Henry Golding, and Rachel Chu, played by Constance Wu, who are dating. Nick grew up in Singapore but moved to New York for a short while. That is where he met Rachel Chu, who grew up in New York and is an economics professor.

Nick’s best friend, Colin Khoo, who is played by Chris Pang, got engaged and is getting married, so he invites Nick to be his best man at his wedding, which is going to be the event of the century. Nick decides this would be the perfect time for Rachel to meet his tough-loving family, so he brings Rachel along with him. However, he fails to tell her anything about his family, leaving Rachel oblivious to what she has coming.

From the very beginning, Nick’s mother, played by actress Michelle Yeoh, does not approve of Rachel because she believes Rachel is not classified on the same society level as her family, the Youngs. In other words, Rachel is not good enough because she is not rich.

While Rachel is battling for the approval of Nick’s mother, she is able to meet up with an old college friend, Goh Peik Lin, played by Awkwafina, who moved back to Singapore after college. Goh Peik Lin helps Rachel build up confidence to keep trying to impress Nick’s mom.  Things end up taking a turn for the worse until the mother comes through.

I watched this movie two times. The first time I watched “Crazy Rich Asians,” I absolutely hated it. I was uncomfortable, stressed, and nervous throughout the movie. I felt like Nick’s mother was degrading me personally, and I had to keep reminding myself that she was not, that it was just a movie.

The mother in the story made me feel insecure about my own life choices, overall, I felt it was too negative. The only part I truly enjoyed was Goh Peik Lin, who was quirky, strange, loving, helpful, bubbly, and funny. She really helped to lift the movie, making it more enjoyable.asians3.0

However, I decided to give the movie a second chance, thinking I might not have liked the movie because I simply do not like stressful negativity. Giving it another go, the second time I watched the movie was a lot better. Knowing about all the negativity helped me to be able to see the comedy in it and laugh a little more.

Even though “Crazy Rich Asians” was better the second time, I felt the movie was dry and repetitive. The only action was the mother hating Rachel, Rachel running to her friend for comfort, and Rachel getting confident to go back to the family, only to run away again. Rachel’s friend was still the best part of the movie to me, seemingly being even more funny the second time around.

Overall, I would still recommend the movie to others, despite my feelings toward it, because most people do not have a problem with negative acting. It has luxurious scenes which everyone loves, and it portrays a royalty feeling.

This movie is based on the book, “Crazy Rich Asians,” written by Keven Kwan. The book is loosely based on the author’s childhood in Singapore. Kwan ended up writing two more books, continuing the story, called “China Rich Girlfriend” and “Rich People Problems.”

I give the movie three stars out of five, because I found the movie to be too negative. Everyone was trying to prove something to someone while at the same time everyone was trying to tear someone else down.

Author: MaKayla Kneisley

Hello, my name is MaKayla Kneisley. I am 20 years old and am attending school at South Plains College for print journalism. I write for the schools news paper, Plainsman Press. I also write poetry and short stories on my own time. Some of my hobbies are aerial fitness, collecting old cameras and typewriters, and riding horses. My motto, Alwaysmile.

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