‘The Crime of Grindelwald’ captivates audiences with nostalgic theme

The newest sequel to “Fantastic Beasts” is filled with action and events that help widen the imagination of what the wizarding world is like.

“Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald” is based on the book “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” which is a companion book to the “Harry Potter” series by author J.K. Rawling.

This movie takes place several years before “Harry Potter,” showing Albus Dumbledore, played by Jude Law, as a young man. Besides Dumbledore, no other characters from “Harry Potter” are in this film.

The movie, which was released on Nov. 13, starts out with Grindelwald, played by Johnny Depp, in a wizard prison. While the prison guards are moving him elsewhere, he starts a fight and escapes.

In an effort to stop Grindelwald from completing his plan, Dumbledore asks his former student, Newt Scamander, played by Eddie Redmayne, for help. Being unaware of the dangers which lie ahead, Newt agrees.

While helping Dumbledore, Newt tries to find a place where he feels he belongs. He does not pick a side right away, runs his actions and judgements off his ethical beliefs, and helps a lot of magical creatures. Eventually his friend, Jacob Kowalski, played by Dan Fogler, asks Newt to help him find his girlfriend, Queenie Goldstein, who is played by Alison Sudol.

In an adventurous quest to help his friend, Newt comes across Tina Goldstein, the woman he likes. Tina, played by Katherine Waterston, joins Newt and Jacob in trying to find Queenie.

While taking shelter in a safe house, Jacob looks into a glass ball and sees Queenie in a grave yard. Rushing out the door, Jacob goes to find his love, while Tina and Newt are trying to find a letter. All end up in the grave yard. They walk into a trap set up by Grindelwald. Having to fight once more, the three are able to escape. Seeing what Grindelwald can do, Newt finally picks a side.

“The Crimes of Grindelwald” is exceptionally good. However, there is a lot of action with little explanation of what is going on. The movie was obviously different from the typical “Harry Potter” theme. With that being said, the movie, as a whole, is good. It brings in a lot of new, cute, and fun magical creatures from around the world, which at times, seemed to be harmful until Newt calms them.

Although the storyline is a little confusing and leaves you with questions, it is intriguing and keeps you on the edge of your seat.

I also did not like how Newt held himself back. He was almost always looking down, hiding his face. He was shy and lacked words when it came to conversing with other humans. He could not make up his mind about what to do in certain situations and seemed to be unsure of himself. At the end, he does seem to become a little more confident after he finally picks which side to be on. However, I felt that he was too introverted.

I thought the movie title was misleading. The title made me think that the movie was going to be about the crimes Grindlewald had already committed. That is not the case, since the movie was about gaining followers to build an army.

Something else I noticed was Professor Dumbledore in a suit. In the “Harry Potter” movies, Dumbledore wears old fashioned wizard robes. Why would Dumbledore go from a modern, sharp, suit to wearing vintage wizard robes? More than likely, this part of the movie was just poorly thought out by the director. But being a big “Harry Potter” fan, I, and I am sure others, noticed this and questioned what happened there.

Even though this movie had a lot of action and showed different events the magical world of Witches and Wizards has outside of Hogwarts, I give it a 7/10.

Author: MaKayla Kneisley

Hello, my name is MaKayla Kneisley. I am 20 years old and am attending school at South Plains College for print journalism. I write for the schools news paper, Plainsman Press. I also write poetry and short stories on my own time. Some of my hobbies are aerial fitness, collecting old cameras and typewriters, and riding horses. My motto, Alwaysmile.

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